Skip to content
Harborough Museum
Fantastic Finds

Fantastic Finds

The treasure hoard included a large number of small artefacts including clothing items, jewellery and many other objects. Some of the artefacts include a unique silver bowl, silver and bronze ingots and blue glass ‘eyes’.

Fantastic Finds

Birdlip brooch – mid 1st century AD

This brooch is made of silver with gild decoration

Brooch spring

Brooch spring

This bronze spring has been stretched by force. In Iron Age and Early Roman Britain, objects were sometimes deliberately broken or ‘ritually killed’ before they were buried. Was this to discourage people from digging them up or was it a symbolic act?

Brooch

Colchester Derivative brooch

This type of brooch usually has a hinged pin but here it has been replaced with a more simple sprung pin. This allowed the brooch to continue to be used after the first spring was damaged.

Bracelet

Snake’s head bracelet, 1st – 3rd century AD

This is part of a bronze bracelet shaped like a snake’s head. Jewellery decorated with snakes was popular in Britain from the 1st – 3rd century AD.

Blue glass discs

Glass discs

Were these blue and white glass discs the eyes of a statue worshipped at the shrine? They were found in an area of stained soil with tiny pieces of gold implying the presence of a wooden statue decorated with gold.

Dolphin brooch, named after its shape

Dolphin brooch

This type of brooch is known as a ‘Dolphin’ due to the shape of the head.

A clip to hold stretched leather

Shield dip, 1st century AD

This bronze clip would have held the leather stretched tight over the wooden frame of a shield.

Fitted to the end of a scabbard

Sword chape, mid-late 1st century AD

This is a bronze shape that would have been fitted at the end of a leather sword scabbard or holder. The circular recess would have originally held a piece of enamel.

Possibly part of a septre

Terminal

This bronze terminal with an iron core may be part of the sceptre. Did an Iron Age priest us this object when conducting ceremonies at the shrine?

Part of a tankard

Tankard Handle, early – mid 1st century AD

This is half of a bronze handle from an Iron Age tankard that was found outside the shrine. It is decorated in a typically Iron Age style with flowing lines and small dots.

A silver bowl

Bowl, early 1st century AD

This beautiful bowl is a unique item from Iron Age Britain. It was found buried carefully on its side with other silver objects in the ditch in what is thought to have been a ritual deposit.

An spearhead

Bronze Age spearhead, around 1500-1250 BC

This spearhead dates from the Middle Bronze Age and implies a long period of activity at the site. It is possible this fragment was dug up during the Roman period and re-deposited as an antique object.

A diamond-shaped brooch

Hinge headed Enamelled brooch

This bronze brooch was originally decorated with enamel

Part of a Roman lamp

Lamp, 1st century AD

One of a pair of bronze wings from the back of a Roman lamp.

An armlet

Cable armlet, 4th century AD

Hallaton continued to be a special place for local people into the 4th century AD as shown by the ritual burial of this bronze armlet with a group of Roman coins.

A beautiful gold clasp

Gold Clasp, 3rd century AD

This is the gold clasp from a Roman necklace or bracelet. It was found buried outside the shrine with other objects and shows the site continued to be the focus of ritual activity for hundreds of years.

This silver mount with gold decoration would have been attached to another object via the holes around the edges. Some of the holes were added after part of the edge was damaged so that it could still be used. This re-use suggests the mount was somebody's treasured procession.

Mount early 1st century AD

This silver mount with gold decoration would have been attached to another object via the holes around the edges. Some of the holes were added after part of the edge was damaged so that it could still be used. This re-use suggests the mount was somebody’s treasured procession.

Used for casting objects

Semi circular ingot

This silver ingot has been cast into an unusual crescent shape. The protruding ‘knob’ at the top is a casting sprue, the remains of where the molten metal was poured into the mould.

Opening hours

Tuesday-Friday: 10am-6pm

Saturday: 10am-4pm

Sunday-Monday: Closed

Contact us

Send a message

Tel: 0116 305 3627

Address: The Symington Building, Adam and Eve Street, Market Harborough, LE16 7LT

The Symington Building logo
Logos for the partners of Harborough Museum including Harborough District Council, Leicestershire County Council, Market Harborough Historical Society and supported by Market Harborough and the Bowdens Charity
Visit England Quality Assured Attraction logo

Copyright 2020 © Leicestershire County Council - Terms of use