Harborough Museum

Fothergill’s cookery book

Fothergill’s cookery book

John Fothergill’s Cookery Book

John Fothergill’s Cookery Book, in the ‘Places to go, people to see’ cabinet at Harborough Museum, was published in 1943 featuring a caricature of Fothergill drawn by political cartoonist, Bert Thomas. This extraordinary Market Harborough innkeeper, who has been likened to the TV sitcom character Basil Fawlty, cooked and served some 200,000 meals using his recipes of ‘strong flavour and colour, practicality and economy’.

Fothergill's cookerybook with a caricature by Bert Thomas.
Fothergill’s cookerybook with a caricature by Bert Thomas.

 

The Three Swan’s Hotel – Royal Associations and an Extraordinary Sign

Fothergill was host of The Three Swans from 1934-1952, but this iconic coaching inn has actually been a haven for travellers for over 500 years. Exceptionally vibrant during the late 1700s and early 1800s it’s been graced by several famous names: King Charles I visited the day before the Battle of Naseby in 1645, while the young King of Denmark, Christian VII, dined here in 1768 after his carriage broke down.

The Three Swans is well worth a visit just for the amazing food, but you can also admire the famous, large and elaborate inn sign hanging from the hotel frontage – one of the best of its kind in England!

And don’t miss Fothergill’s self-portrait hanging in the back bar keeping an eye on proceedings.

A photo of High Street, Market Harborough around 1910-1920. The Three Swans is the white building towards the back of the photo.
A photo of High Street, Market Harborough around 1910-1920. The Three Swans is the white building towards the back of the photo.

Market Harborough – A Haven for Foodies

If you like food, then Harborough is definitely the place for you.

There are regular farmers markets and artisan markets on The Square, a huge variety of restaurants, cafes, pubs and hotels, as well as plenty of independent food shops.

Find out more the Explore Harborough website.

A postcard of the Sheep Market in Market Harborough, around 1900. This took place in The Square which now hosts regular farmers and artisans markets.
The Sheep market, around 1900. This took place in The Square which now hosts regular farmers and artisans markets.

Our thanks to volunteer, Susan Hammond, for writing this month’s blog entry!

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